Performancing Metrics

Archive for March, 2011

Posterous Makes Group Blogs Fun Again For Android, iPhone

The Posterous team have recently updated their iPhone and Android apps, which now allow users to create private groups without having to power up the notebook.

With today’s iPhone and Android releases, friends, family members and colleagues can now create and participate in a Posterous Group from their phone, the Web or via email without limitations.

And because every group deserves a home, each Posterous Group gets its own beautiful private web site. In other words, you can communicate with members entirely by mobile and email but your group’s memories are permanently archived and viewable on your group site. (Official Posterous Blog)

Posterous fans can add friends directly from their contact list, although unfortunately there doesn’t seem to be a way to add new members later on from within the app.

Users can also comment upon group blogs as well as like individual posts within the apps as well (two features which are sadly unavailable for regular Posterous blogs).

The only major bug that I discovered in iOS was when adding images from ones album, as Posterous does not show any images (note: is anyone else experiencing this?).

The latest update is available to Android and iPhone fans, and for those of you sporting a Blackberry device you may have to resort to email until Posterous launches an official app.

Categories: Blogging News
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Blogging Pitfalls: Keeping Your Private Life Private

Blogging is, by its very nature, a public act. Every word you put online is in front of the entire world and everything you say is instantly searchable and viewable by anyone with the curiosity and motivation to find it.

However, even bloggers who talk about their personal lives typically want to have some level of segregation between their online presence and their existence away from the computer. Most people don’t want random calls on their telephones, they don’t want their personal information posted on the Web and they certainly don’t want to have their identities stolen.

The problem is that the Web does not always respect the boundaries we wish it would. The Web can, and often does, intrude into our private lives in ways that we would not like and, as bloggers,we are especially vulnerable to this.

While it’s not a problem you can completely eliminate, especially with the ever-growing list of research tools and public databases that can impact even those who don’t have an online presence at all, it is a problem we can mitigate.

Unfortunately, it requires some advance planning and forethought into these issues, the nature of the Web is that once something is put out there it stays out there. Still, most of the steps are common sense and are just as important for non-bloggers as they are the most prolific authors working.

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Categories: Blogging Tips
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Turkey Blocking Blogger Over 1 BlogSpot Blog?

Turkey is apparently about to deny its citizens the right to access Blogger.com in the near future.

However unlike last time when they banned YouTube, Turkey is denying access to the service over what appears to be a copyright dispute.

Serhat Özeren, chairman of the Telecommunications and Energy Services Consumer Rights and Industry Research Association (TEDER) and head of the Internet Council at the Ministry of Transportation, said a Diyarbakır court has issued an order to block blogspot.com after Digiturk filed a complaint against the website on the grounds that it violated the company’s broadcasting rights of Turkey’s top football division. (World Bulletin)

Although copyright infringement is a serious issue (one that even bloggers have to deal with), restricting everyone else’s access due to one offender is a bit extreme in my honest opinion.

There is no word on how long this ban will last (or whether Google will appeal the decision), but hopefully this censorship will be short lived.

According to World Bulletin, the Turkish Parliament is considering a bill that would prevent heavy handed measures like this in the future, and allow the government to block the offending website at the sub domain instead.

Note: Since BlogSpot blogs can simply change domains at a whim, it would be wiser for the company (as well as the Turkish government) to simply send Google a cease and desist order in the future instead of issuing multiple bans against a single offender.

Categories: Blogging News
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