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US Government Embracing Tumblr?

While Tumblr is used by millions of people ranging from fashion artists, news organizations and professional bloggers, this is the first time the platform has been embraced by the US Federal government.

“GSA negotiated the Tumblr terms of service, and we are the first federal agency using Tumblr,” said GSA spokesman Robert Lesino. […]

“We chose Tumblr because it is a rapidly growing platform,” said Jessica Milcetich, USA.gov Blog manager. “It not only is for blogging, but it offers social features so people can share, comment and connect.” (Federal Computer Week)

It’s unclear what the GSA was using before (note: does anyone else know?), although they imported all of their posts upon Tumblr from their previous platform.

The agency is also using Disqus to power their comment section, and seems to enjoy writing lengthy posts (which isn’t exactly typical of the average Tumblr user).

While it’s not surprising to see the government adopt blog service platforms (after all, the “much loved” TSA uses Blogger), Tumblr’s embrace by the agency signals that the micro blogging service has gone mainstream (which should please their investors).

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Comments

  1. Kevin Kimes ) says: 6/7/2011

    Wow, what a fantastic waste of tax money. I’m sure there’s at least several overpaid employees dedicated to that blog, and one look makes clear it’s uselessness. It’s generating almost no discussion, and the content is of so unfocused that I doubt it has more than a small handful of people regularly look at it.

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    • Brant Merrell says: 6/7/2012

      It’s typical for politicians to pay thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars for 30-second tv adds. Blogging is a relatively detailed and cost-effective (free) medium by which government officials can tell their side of the story to voters. I think getting rid of that tradition in the name of monetary savings would be expensive; more importantly, it would push them to the baseless one-liners of ordinary advertising, darkening the depth and clarity of their message.

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