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Melody Leaves Movable Type’s Shadow, Embraces 1.0

After spending many months in beta, Melody (a fork from Movable Type) has finally shed its Release Candidate skin with the unveiling of its first professional version.

Although the team behind Melody boasts about the platform’s stability and security (which everyone usually says about their preferred CMS), the blog software might have one advantage when compared against rivals.

One area of the product we have paid special attention to is in theme creation and management. And as some indication that we are on the right track, Melody’s new theming framework has already led to creation of a number of new themes for the platform. Designers for the platform have all noted how much easier it is to build a web site, even when compared to other platforms. They like the fact that they are not required to know or understand the complex syntax of a programming language; they appreciate that they don’t need to learn Perl or PHP[.] (Official Melody Blog)

The ability to easily create themes could be Melody’s ticket towards survival in an already crowded market, enabling theme designers from Blogger, WordPress and Tumblr to easily port their creations without relearning new code.

Unfortunately most of the new Melody themes are hosted upon Github, although hopefully the team takes a cue from WordPress by offering live previews of themes instead (as Github may not appeal to the general non-geek population).

Curious readers can download Melody as well as test out the software upon their own servers, and for those of you who have tried the platform, would you consider leaving Movable Type (or WordPress) for Melody? Why or why not?

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Comments

  1. Mike T says: 4/21/2011

    The ability to easily create themes could be Melody’s ticket towards survival in an already crowded market, enabling theme designers from Blogger, WordPress and Tumblr to easily port their creations without relearning new code.

    One of our critical advantages is the fact that our template language closely resembles HTML, so a theme designer would actually start with the published content of their WordPress or Blogger design and work backwards to a template rather than convert PHP to MTML. I’ve found that most WordPress themes are pretty trivial to convert to Melody (I’ve converted a few dozen by now). In general, it takes me only a few hours to go from start to finish unless there are a lot of configuration options I have to implement through ConfigAssistant.

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