Performancing Metrics

Tumblr Flys Past 20 Million Blogs

It’s been only 15 days Tumblr sprinted past 19 million blogs, and now the micro blogging service is now hosting over 20 million blogs upon their servers.

Tumblr’s latest feat puts the service within striking distance of WordPress.com, who recently passed the 20 million blog milestone last month.

According to Quantcast, Tumblr has recently jumped up a spot to 33 (previously they were ranked 34 out of the top million sites), which puts Tumblr between WalMart and Reference.com (who hold the 32nd and 34th top spots, respectively).

Tumblr has received a lot of media attention, as the service (or rather the community) was credited with helping a man retrieve his stolen MacBook as well as partnering with SoundCloud (a popular service amongst music fans).

While the micro blogging service isn’t as advanced as rivals like WordPress and Blogger, Tumblr seems to have found a way to not only appeal to teenagers, but also businesses, media companies and (surprisingly) a government agency.

For those of you who use the service to compliment their blog (or even replace it as their main site), why do you think Tumblr is growing so fast despite fierce competition from rivals?

Categories: Blogging News
Tags:

This post was written by . You can visit the for a short bio, more posts, and other information about the author.

Comment with Your Facebook Account

Comments

  1. Nishant Soni ) says: 6/4/2011

    Good article Darnell. I personally have learnt a lot from tumblr’s marketing campaigns.

    I must state that the idea of tumblr is “not-so-great”, but marketing campaigns were awesome which actually took it to the next level.

    Reply

  2. Bakari ) says: 6/6/2011

    I recently started blogging on Tumblr again. A few years ago I tried using the site for just posting photos, but didn’t hang out there much because it seemed like there were mostly teens posting on the site. Nothing wrong with that, but I wasn’t finding too many bloggers that posted about my interests. That’s not so anymore. I mainly use my Tumblr like the newszine I never got around to publishing back in the day. Tumblr’s microblogging structure is perfect for those topics and issues that I rarely get to talk about anywhere else. I like the growing community of atheists, ant-war, and humanist bloggers I’ve connected with on there. Compared to Posterous, I just find Tumblr to have a more hipster community.

    Reply

  3. Kevin Kimes ) says: 6/7/2011

    Of all those links, not a single one is actually a direct link to the Tumblr site. Somehow that just seems like it’s meant to frustrate us readers ;)

    Of course it’s great to cross link to as many of your own articles as possible, and a great job of that is being done. But perhaps the link titled “their main site” could be a link to “their main site”, instead of a year old post. :)

    Anyhow, I don’t think I’ll be moving to their platform for any of my blogs, doesn’t seem like the ideal choice for any professional or aspiring-professional bloggers.

    Reply

  4. Trish ) says: 6/8/2011

    When I decided to start blogging, I tried out WordPress, Blogger, TypePad, and Tumblr. 2 months later and I’m just on Tumblr. I think a lot of that has to do with my subject matter (horror films) which lends itself to picture-heavy posts. I also really like that Tumblr makes it so easy to search for other blogs to follow and to interact with other users.

    That said, if the blog I authored was more “word-heavy” or required longer posts, I’d use WordPress because of the Dashboard feature on Tumblr. I use the “Read More” option when I feel like it’s warranted, but for the most part I think Tumblr users interact with the blogs they follow through the Dashboard so I try to keep the posts short.

    Reply

  5. malta car rental says: 1/31/2012

    After reading this I thought it was informative , i appreciate you taking the time and effort to put this posts.

    Reply

Current ye@r *