Performancing Metrics

Archive for the ‘Blog Statistics’ Category

Analysis of Bloggers

There is a great post up on Read/WriteWeb about bloggers, the types that are currently out there, and where the blogosphere may be heading. It is a bit long, but very enjoyable, especially if you are interested in blogging for a variety of reasons.

Here is a snippet from the article:

It was a good conference and we had several interesting conversations, but I walked away with a strange feeling. Somehow it seemed that blogging just isn’t that hot anymore. The feeling has been exacerbated by the latest slow down in news. My feeds just do not update that often these days. Can it be that the digestion phase applies to blogs just as it applies to startups? In this post we’ll investigate whether the blogosphere is going through a digestion phase.

Definitely worth a read though I hope we are not in a digestion phase. I still like the crazy unbridled growth we’ve seen over the past two or three years.

Categories: Blog Statistics

Desktop RSS Readers on the way out?

Read/WriteWeb has an article up that shows the results of two polls they ran, one was in January of this year, and the other was earlier in July. They ask where we read and manage our RSS subscriptions. I am all about online RSS readers, and it seems like I am not alone, with the poll responders leaning that way away from desktop applications. Pretty much all other types remained the same as the previous poll.

Firstly, the above stats show that people are migrating from desktop to browser-based RSS Readers. The percentage change in one is virtually a mirror of the other, while none of the other categories has changed much (if any). Web-based Readers are up 7% and desktop Readers are down 6%. In the space of 6 months. I attribute this mostly to the strong growth of Google Reader, which in most peoples’ Feedburner stats is in the top 3 Readers. Google Reader has been the most innovative major RSS Reader over the past year, and a lot of people I know use it as their main Reader now (as do I). Bloglines and Rojo also continue to be popular.

Check out their results, and let me know if you agree or disagree with their conclusions.

Categories: Blog Statistics, Feed Tools

Google & FeedBurner

So the news broke, and some of my colleagues in Bloggy Network have already expressed their opinions when it comes to Google buying FeedBurner for $100 million dollars and so I wanted to recap some of what they have said, and add in my own thoughts on the acquisition.

Ahmed believes that this will provide Google with even more information about the elusive blogosphere and has published a post entitled Google & FeedBurner: Double Whammy.

So the acquisition of FeedBurner gives them a ton more information. They know clickrate. They know the subscription # of a lot of sites. They can find information/data they previously did not know existed (which I touched on briefly).

I talk about covering the A to Z process for our properties – Google has done the same. They know what end-users are doing (via Google Analytics). They know what end-users are reading and finding interesting (via Google Reader). And now they know how popular blogs are, and what people find interesting on those specific blogs (via Google FeedBurner). And don’t forget they can trick your ad habits now – not just via AdSense/Adwords, but also through DoubleClick now.

Griffith, over on Forever Geek, has published a post called Google acquires FeedBurner for $100 million.

He goes over more of the meat and potatoes of the deal, and give a quick nod to the possible inclusion of Adsense in RSS feeds.

Although FeedBurner already gave you the option of adding advertisement to your feeds, my guess is that now it will be Adsense exclusive, if it isn’t already (I haven’t checked in a long time). Other than that, you can probably rest assured that it will remain free for everyone. The only difference is that it will probably be integrated into more Google products.

I agree with both of them. This gives Google even more information on a wide variety of sites, and while Google is not really known for improving the features of a service they buy, they have started to make some serious headway with their Blogger platform, and I can see FeedBurner becoming an integral part of their Blogger blogs. As well as providing them with a large user base that they can get using Adsense both on their sites, and in their feeds. With FeedBurner, Adsense, and Analytics, they will be able to provide you with advertising and statistics to cover every angle.

I think this was a great move for both Google and for FeedBurner, and I look forward to seeing what interesting ways that FeedBurner is integrated into Google’s already powerful brand.

Categories: Advertising, Blog Statistics, Feed Tools

Google & FeedBurner

So the news broke, and some of my colleagues in Bloggy Network have already expressed their opinions when it comes to Google buying FeedBurner for $100 million dollars and so I wanted to recap some of what they have said, and add in my own thoughts on the acquisition.

Ahmed believes that this will provide Google with even more information about the elusive blogosphere and has published a post entitled Google & FeedBurner: Double Whammy.

So the acquisition of FeedBurner gives them a ton more information. They know clickrate. They know the subscription # of a lot of sites. They can find information/data they previously did not know existed (which I touched on briefly).

I talk about covering the A to Z process for our properties – Google has done the same. They know what end-users are doing (via Google Analytics). They know what end-users are reading and finding interesting (via Google Reader). And now they know how popular blogs are, and what people find interesting on those specific blogs (via Google FeedBurner). And don’t forget they can trick your ad habits now – not just via AdSense/Adwords, but also through DoubleClick now.

Griffith, over on Forever Geek, has published a post called Google acquires FeedBurner for $100 million.

He goes over more of the meat and potatoes of the deal, and give a quick nod to the possible inclusion of Adsense in RSS feeds.

Although FeedBurner already gave you the option of adding advertisement to your feeds, my guess is that now it will be Adsense exclusive, if it isn’t already (I haven’t checked in a long time). Other than that, you can probably rest assured that it will remain free for everyone. The only difference is that it will probably be integrated into more Google products.

I agree with both of them. This gives Google even more information on a wide variety of sites, and while Google is not really known for improving the features of a service they buy, they have started to make some serious headway with their Blogger platform, and I can see FeedBurner becoming an integral part of their Blogger blogs. As well as providing them with a large user base that they can get using Adsense both on their sites, and in their feeds. With FeedBurner, Adsense, and Analytics, they will be able to provide you with advertising and statistics to cover every angle.

I think this was a great move for both Google and for FeedBurner, and I look forward to seeing what interesting ways that FeedBurner is integrated into Google’s already powerful brand.

Categories: Advertising, Blog Statistics, Feed Tools

WordPress.com Stats for WordPress.org Users

Big news today for those of you that have been jealous of WordPress.com’s statistics, they are finally a plugin for those of you hosting your WordPress blog elsewhere. Much like Akismet, the new WordPress statistics plugin called Automattic Stats has been released. It is a service based plugin, that requires a WordPress API key.

I am super excited to try this out. I haven’t just yet, as I am on my laptop in a hotel, but as soon as I am back on a real computer, I will be all over it.

Here are some details:

Installing this stats plugin is much like installing Akismet, all you need is to put in your API Key and the rest is automatic.

Once it’s running it’ll begin collecting information about your pageviews, which posts and pages are the most popular, where your traffic is coming from, and what people click on when they leave. It’ll also add a link to your dashboard which allows you to see all your stats on a single page. Less is more.

Finally, because all of the processing and collection runs on our servers and not yours, it doesn’t cause any additional load on your hosting account. In fact, it’s one of the fastest stats system, hosted or not hosted, that you can use.

This was recently announced on WordPress.com, but I think it deserves a post on WordPress.org’s blog.

Categories: Blog Statistics, WordPress News

Blog Growth Peaking?

Over on BusinessWeek’s Blogspotting has posted some interesting details, it seems like the growth of new active blogs has slowed over the last few months, and they are going as far as to say that we are peaking, at least in the English speaking world.

Here’s his answer: “The number of new posts per day that Technorati is tracking is indeed increasing, from about 1.3 million posts per day to about 1.5 million postings per day.”

However, there has been slight decrease in the number of English-language posts.

The number of daily English language posts dropped to 495,000 in March from 507,000 in October.

In other words, in October 2006, 39% of blog posts were in English. In March 2007, only 33% were in in English.

In his email Sifry says “My conclusion is that we’re still seeing growth in the blogosphere, but that the growth is slowing.”

Check out the full post, and let me know what you think this means for the blogosphere in general.

Categories: Blog Statistics

How Much Would You Pay for a WordPress Theme?

The title of this post is the same question that is being asked at WPDesigner.com today in hopes of judging a fair price for what I assume is a custom WordPress theme. I have priced getting one created before, and the price for me has ranged from about two hundred dollars, all the way up to around three and four thousand dollars. While a non-unique theme, slightly modified was more in the ten to hundred dollar range.

The poll on WPDesigner only allows you to chose one of four choices being either, five dollars, ten dollars, twenty dollars or forty-five dollars. Currently, there are less than twenty-five voters, but so far the consensus seems to be that twenty dollars is pricing it right.

Have your say at WPDesigner.com.

Categories: Blog Statistics, WordPress Themes

The FeedBurner Top 40

Over on franticindustries they have a list of the top forty blogs according to their FeedBurner subscribers. While it isn’t precise, and he even mentions going about it in an unscientific way, he still releases his results and they are fun to read.

Here is a snippet from his article:

However, FeedBurner, for some reason, isn’t trying to be a popularity measuring tool. They have the data. They have the capabilities. Yet, they’re not maintaining any sort of top list of feeds with the most subscribers. The number of RSS subscribers is not the ultimate way to measure the popularity of a website, but it’s a really important metric. If FeedBurner were to maintain such a top list, it would be at least as important as Technorati and Alexa’s top lists.

Besides waiting for FeedBurner to actually do a top list, the second best thing I could do is to create my own list of top blogs according to their FeedBurner RSS subscriber data. Maybe this experiment encourages the folks at FeedBurner to do the same thing themselves.

And now for the top five from his top forty list:

  • BoingBoing – 397k Readers
  • TechCrunch – 341k Readers
  • Simply Recipes – 212k Readers
  • Interesting Thing of the Day – 99935 Readers
  • 43Folders – 102k Readers

Readers fluctuate, which I assume is why 43Folders has more readers as of my checking it today.

via 901am

Categories: Blog Statistics

Bloggers and Social Bookmarking Survey

Peter van Gerner recently e-mailed me to let me know about a survey he is running which is focused upon bloggers and social bookmarking. The results will be published on his blog, and it only takes a few minutes to complete. The survey closes on the 14th of March, so please take a look. If you notice that the English is a little off, that is only because this is a survey created by someone in the Netherlands.

If you are interested in participating, please check out www.petervangerner.nl

Categories: Blog Statistics

Blogger Payouts Formula

Abe Olandres has written an article on the Blog Herald about how bloggers are paid and how they should be paid. He mentions a few things blog networks could do to make their writers happier including things like:

  • Traffic Bonus
  • Seniority Bonus
  • Performance Bonus
  • Travel & Training
  • Schwag Bags

I love his write-ups for each section and totally agree with his positive spin on this otherwise touchy subject.

Basically, to throw my thoughts in the ring when it comes to blogging payouts. I think that if you aren’t making at least minimum wage after blogging for a network for at least six months, then you might want to concentrate on something else that can make you that kind of money.

Categories: Blog Statistics