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Posts Tagged ‘Tutorials’

How to Move From WordPress.com to WordPress.org

WordPress.com is a hosted service, which allows you to set up multiple blogs for free, however there are optional paid options which add functionality to your blog. WordPress.com is perfect for a beginner blogger, however many bloggers find that it is to restrictive and looks unprofessional. In this Conor P. explains how to move from WordPress.com to WordPress.org, with the help of some video tutorials.

Visit the tutorial here.

Categories: Linking, WordPress Tips, WordPress Tutorials
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Retrieve Your Twitter Followers Number Without API Issues

In this WPShout entry Angela Giese provides the code to use and retrieve the number of your Twitter followers without being hit by the Twitter API restrictions, which popular bloggers can suffer from. This work around is mainly aimed at popular sites not using the Twitter widget.

Once you have added the code to your functions.php you can easily implement the number of Twitter followers anywhere in your theme or design.

Read the tutorial, completely with copiable code, at WPShout.

Categories: Linking, WordPress Tips, WordPress Tutorials
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How To Easily Edit Your WordPress Theme Design With The Firebug Firefox Addon

Firebug for FirefoxAs bloggers, we aim to provide unique user experiences for all our visitors online through the use of the best blog designs and templates we can find. Although there are thousands of free and premium themes available, there comes a time when we want something specifically suited to our taste as well as our readers’ without hiring a developer.

The ability to customize your own blog theme is an invaluable skill and will save you lots of time and money in the long-run; and through the use of a tool like the Firebug Firefox Add-on, making simple and advanced customizations are easier than ever. Firebug is a tool I use extensively as a developer to help me understand a site’s layout and quickly implement design changes through CSS. So here are some tips and ideas to get you started on customizing your own WordPress themes. Read More

Categories: Blog Design, WordPress Tutorials
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How To: Display Your WordPress Category List in Multiple Columns

Do you sometimes get that feeling to go all overboard and do things differently with your design? OK, I might not be the most creative person with visual designs, actually I like simplicity, but the fact was that I recently switched to a single-column design for my own WordPress blog.

With simplicity, and single-column design, came the following problem: ‘How to implement a smart navigation?’ Important is to understand my blog: iFranky is a mix of several topics and is both my brand and a personal space to write about life as well as a tumblelog and collection of interesting entries I wrote on other blogs. The readership is a mix of friends, bloggers, clients and students I lecture about blogging and social media. This leads to a mix of different topics, but not all are worth to be displayed on the home page.
The main navigation factor is based on the categories, categories I used in previous designs iterations to display multiple loops on the home page or to implement different backgrounds.

Simplicity meant that my complete navigation would be send to the footer, an often overlooked design element (There is no fold), even the header navigation.
Because my main page only shows the main entries, I somehow had to integrate a category list in the footer but who wants to add one column of more than 15 categories or a drop-down? Trust me when I say that I have analysed click behaviour and barely one bothers with these often sky-high columns or drop-downs. The solution: display your category list in columns. Read More

Categories: WordPress Tutorials
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Automate WordPress Database and Files Backup

Regularly backing up your database and files is one of the most important things to do when running a website. One never knows what could happen and the words have become infamous:

I was sure I had a backup.

Most database plugins for WordPress offer the option to weekly backup your database and even email it to you but if you have a popular site, you might want to prefer a more frequent backup routine. Imagine how many posts and comments Gawker would lose if they only kept weekly backups and suffered problems the 6th day after their last backup.

Another problem with all database plugins is that they will not backup your files. With server storage space being really cheap nowadays, you can easily have several backup procedures in place, even if you host many pictures on your blog.

Personally I have three different, totally automated backup routines, using cron jobs:

  1. Daily backup
  2. Weekly backup
  3. Monthly backup

The reason why I also use weekly and monthly backups is because if you have a corrupted database, probably your daily backups will be corrupted and unusable. This can happen on sites you do not use on a daily basis.
Daily backups are overwritten every 7 days, weekly and monthly backups are stored with attached timestamp.

Because most web hosting companies offer cPanel in their package, this tutorial is based on cPanel but the syntax is the same for Plesk and other backends.

What Are Cron Jobs

From Wikipedia:

Cron is driven by a crontab, a configuration file that specifies shell commands to run periodically on a given schedule.

Backing up your database.

In your cPanel (http://yoururl/cpanel) under the header Advanced Tools, you will find a link Cron Jobs. Click this link or click the icon on the right if your cPanel is setup with icons.
On the next page choose Advanced (Unix Style). There is no real difference between both options, the needed attention level is the same and in both simple and advanced you have to fill in the correct command.

Read More

Categories: Backups
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Tutorial: How To Merge 2 WordPress Blogs

For a project I am involved with we recently considered merging 2 rather large WordPress blogs. These were 2 blogs with several thousands entries and posts and at least 20 authors have written on those blogs over the years. The combined blog would have more than 10,000 entries and more than 40,000 comments.

In this post I am going to walk you trough the whole process, because it is simpler than it sounds and should not scare anyone away. Depending on how ‘hardcore’ you, the merger could be done in some hours only. Yes, some hours only.

Getting Started

Although this tutorial is aimed at both ‘beginners’ and ‘pros’, I assume that you have a certain basic knowledge, understanding from WordPress and setup already:

  • You know how to backup a database;
  • You know how to FTP;
  • You have a localhost setup;
  • You have a basic understanding of WordPress database tables, ie. when I mention wp_options, you know that this is a database table and you know how to ‘find’ this table;
  • You know how to make changes to the database

The walkthrough is also based on both blogs running a similar permalink structure and using the same plugins. Read More

Categories: WordPress Tutorials
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