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Website Traffic: SEO Objective or Means to an End?

Website Traffic: SEO Objective or Means to an End?

Web presence management provider Conductor, in partnership with research firm Ascend2, releases an SEO research study “Inside Enterprise SEO: SEO Survey Benchmarks for Large Companies.” The survey consists of valuable data for marketers about how SEO has performed for clients in terms of meeting their business goals.

One of the most interesting statistics uncovered by the study is the perceived importance of increasing website traffic by marketing, sales, and business professionals:

Inside Enterprise SEO: SEO Survey Benchmarks for Large Companies

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According to the survey, increasing website traffic is the second most important objective, behind increasing lead generation.

Well, I’m here to tell you that website traffic should never be an exclusive objective of your SEO strategy.

Read More »Website Traffic: SEO Objective or Means to an End?

Is It Still Worth Starting an Online Publication Today?

With the millions of blogs, web sites, and online publications to be found today, is it still worth your time to join the fray? Or is too late to join the game?

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The answer is actually simple: yes.

The point where it gets complicated is what you mean by “worth it” and the reasons you want to enter the world of online publishing. There are a multitude of reasons one might want to start an online publication at this point.

One, you want to make it big and be rich like famous probloggers.

Two, you need an online platform to reach a wider audience for your business, no matter what size, brick-and-mortar or eCommerce.

Three, you just want to have a place online where you can write and share your thoughts, with the hopes of building an audience with profit not being the main goal.

Whichever reason you may have (it may not even be one of those three), I do think that there are enough justifications to support anyone who wants to start an online publication.Read More »Is It Still Worth Starting an Online Publication Today?

The Temptation of Shutting Down Your Social Media Accounts

We’ve all faced this temptation at least once. With all the noise there is online, it is only understandable. Take a look at your Facebook feed (although I probably don’t have to say that). What’s the ratio of people complaining/showing off/being passive-aggressive/etc. to people who actually have statuses that matter to you? How about ads and posts that are purely promotional?

social media overload

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Then there’s Twitter. Depending on how many people you follow – and if you use lists – the chances are that you are drowning in your stream.

Read More »The Temptation of Shutting Down Your Social Media Accounts

How to Give Feedback to Guest Bloggers the Right Way

As someone who has been a guest blogger on approximately 80 different blogs, I feel as though I’ve seen it all when it comes to feedback. I have been asked to create an outline, articles have been sent back to me full of red and purple markings, articles have been completely ignored, and some of my articles have received nothing but a “no thank you” (no name, not greeting, just those three little words). As a writer, I have personal preferences as to how I think feedback should be handled. However, I also work on the flip side—I run a blog that accepts guests posts and I am constantly in a position to give feedback. Oddly enough, the way I give feedback to guest bloggers as an editor and the way I want to get feedback as a writer are completely different.

As a writer, I like it when an editor just tells me in one sentence why my article doesn’t work for their blog so I can send it somewhere else. I am not interested in seeing the hundreds of little comments an editor makes. If they have an idea about something that could make the article better then that’s great, but in general I am interested in getting my articles posted in a timely fashion. I am not offended (usually) if an editor doesn’t like my article, I will just try better next time.

Read More »How to Give Feedback to Guest Bloggers the Right Way

WordCamps Need to be GPL too now?

WordPress logoJane Wells from Automattic published an update on the WordCamp How To blogtoday which is a warm welcome to anyone wanting to host a WordCamp. I have been lucky enough to help organize a WordCamp here in the Netherlands last year and hope to repeat that this year -yes, you’re all invited 🙂 – and anything and everything is welcome to help make that a smoother experience for all attending.

Guidelines

The newly drafted guidelines are in fact pretty much straight forward on most topic such but there there are some questions it raises.

  1. It’s about everything WordPress. The guidelines state that it for 80% should be about WordPress.
  2. Open to all, easy to access, shared with community.WordCamps are meant to be low-key local gatherings that are affordable – cheap, even – to allow people from all walks of life to attend, meet, share, and learn.
  3. Locally organized and focused. Showcasing local talent and helping local practitioners connect is one of the best things about WordCamp. The best WordCamps tend to have both local and visiting speakers.
  4. Read More »WordCamps Need to be GPL too now?

Open Source Communities Function Best With Strong Leaders. Perfect Leaders Do Not Exist.

Matt Mullenweg

Finally the news has hit the scene, while being as overdue as this post probably is: there finally is a WordPress Foundation. But this entry is not about the WordPress Foundation but about the weakness of communities and their need for strong leaders, using the WordPress community as a perfect example.

More than two years ago, during the heated sponsored themes FUD debate, I wrote that it was time to return the WordPress trademark to the Community and was also called out, by Matt himself, for it being an attack post. I have been a critic of Matt for a long time already but there is one thing ‘the community’ must understand: Matt has the guts most people would not have. Every community needs their Matt Mullenweg.

Period. Read More »Open Source Communities Function Best With Strong Leaders. Perfect Leaders Do Not Exist.

WordPress Announces Canonical Plugins. Some Thoughts On proposed Names.

The WordPress Core Commit Team ended their meeting after WordCamp Orlando and has announced on the development blog that there will be canonical plugins in the future.

What are ‘canonical plugins’?

The first question which comes to mind is ‘What are canonical plugins?‘. The team has provided the following definition:

Canonical plugins would be plugins that are community developed (multiple developers, not just one person) and address the most popular functionality requests with superlative execution. These plugins would be GPL and live in the WordPress.org repo, and would be developed in close connection with WordPress core. There would be a very strong relationship between core and these plugins that ensured that a) the plugin code would be secure and the best possible example of coding standards, and b) that new versions of WordPress would be tested against these plugins prior to release to ensure compatibility.

Canonical plugins will not be developed by one plugin developer anymore but by the community. They will also have their official web presence on the wordpress.org plugin repository instead of on website of the (original) developer.
What does this mean for several plugin developers? If you have a popular plugin and your plugin contains a ‘Donate’ button, be prepared to ditch this button if you want your plugin to be taken in consideration. This would be the case for example for. Arne Brachold’s Google (XML) Sitemap Generator and Donncha’s WP Super Cache plugin.

How to name ‘canonical plugins’?

The team clearly identified that the term canonical rather niche is and asks the community to vote on how these ‘super plugins’ should be categorised/labelled. The entry on the develop blog offers some names for canonical plugins:

Read More »WordPress Announces Canonical Plugins. Some Thoughts On proposed Names.

For The Case of WordPress, Against Self-Indulgent Promoters Who Were Hacked

Last weekend was filled with controversy and the reason for this was a worm hitting many self-hosted WordPress blogs. We warned and urged everyone to upgrade, although the most recent version of WordPress, 2.8.4, was released almost 3 weeks earlier. WordPress 2.8.4 was the second security update for the 2.8 branch in less than 2 weeks. This update was released only 2 days after the vulnerability was discovered, proving how hard the WordPress community has worked to improve and secure the platform.

Ever since WordPress 2.3, which was released almost exactly 2 years ago, every WordPress blogger receives an update notification whenever a new version available is. The majority of new releases are bug fixes and security updates.
Personally, whenever I see that yellow new release notification I can not hit update now fast enough. If it weren’t for the security aspect then it is for the ugliness of the notification.

Nevertheless, in these days some people are given a megaphone online and can not resist the need to be vocal, even though they were the only ones who were to blame. One of these people last weekend was Robert Scoble. His post I don’t feel safe with WordPress, Hackers broke in and took things quickly went viral Robert received support but also bashing. Gruber even went as far to say that Movable Type safer is. Read More »For The Case of WordPress, Against Self-Indulgent Promoters Who Were Hacked